Oracle Data Visualization -Hands on Lab

“Use Oracle Data
Visualization (DV) to quickly discover analytic insights through
visualizations that you build against a variety of data sources that
you seamlessly blend together.”


Triggered by both Mike Durran and the Amis Oracle OpenWorld & CodeOne review I went through the OOW18 Session Catalog. The Oracle Data Visualization Hands on Lab is an easy way to get in touch with this product. I decided to give it a quick try.

Next to this I am also trying out the Oracle Cloud. I already provisioned an Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud database (ADWC). It could be nice to combine part of the Hands on Lab with the Oracle Cloud trial.

Impact of Social Media Campaigns on
Product Sales

According to Mike, the Hands on Lab material can be downloaded here.

The Hands on Lab material consists of a pdf with the different steps to be taken. Next to that there are two .xlsx-files with the data.

I decided to try and use Oracle SQL Developer to load the .xlsx-files into my Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud database. This proces is relatively straightforward.

Make sure you have a SQL Developer connection to ADWC. How you should achieve that is described in the Oracle Help Center.

Via an Right-Mouse-Click, you can Import Data.

Import Data

As from here it is just following the wizard and load the .xlsx-files into ADWC.

Data Preview
Import Method
Choose Columns
Column Definition

Make sure all column names are valid. In the above example ‘DATE’ is a reserveren word. Special characters, like ‘#’, also need special attention.

Column re-Definition
Finish

If everything goes well, the data is loaded into a table, specified in the ‘Import Method’. In this case it is the table: KOOLKART_SALES_DATA.

Table imported

Repeat similar steps for the other .xlsx-file.

If you want to proceed with the Hands on Lab you need to connect Oracle Data Visualization Desktop (DVD) to ADWC. The Oracle A-Team has dedicated a blogpost to this process. When DVD and ADWC are connected, a Data Set can be created.

Create Data Set

From this point onwards, it’s easy to follow the Hands on Lab.

It’s nice to see how easy various components within the Oracle stack can communicate together. This blog only covers the first 58 or so pages. I guess the other steps can be followed just as easy. If there is anything worth mentioning or when I will take a sidestep again I will post again.

Good Luck.

Author: Daan Bakboord

I am a Self Employed Oracle Data & Analytics Consultant with a great interest in anything closely related to Oracle Big Data Analytics (OBIEE, BICS, OAC, Big Data, Data Integration, Data Visualization, Data Management, Data Architecture).

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