Separate the Signals from the Noise

Earlier this year I wrote two blogposts about the publication of Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Business Intelligence and Analytic Platforms.

Without choosing sides between Gartner or Oracle, it is clear that the landscape of analytics (and the tools and techniques to support analytics) is changing.

Today I viewed a webcast where both Rita Sallam (Research Vice President Business Analytics and Data Sciences @ Gartner) and Rich Clayton (Vice President Business Analytics @ Oracle) express their views on:

  • The current and future state of the BI/Analytics market
  • Oracle’s answer to the evolution of this market
  • Some of the types of Analytics use cases
  • How to see the signals in your data and discover the answers

Find the link to the webcast below:

The Industry Experts’ Guide to the Changing Landscape of Analytics

Quistor believes in Oracle’s strategy when it comes to Business Intelligence and Analytics. If necessary or desired, we would be happy to put things in context.

Daan Bakboord

This article is originally written for LinkedIn.

So Oracle did not make it to the Magic Quadrant for Business Intelligence and Analytics Platforms?

MQ for BI & Analytics - 2016Earlier this month Gartner released a new version of the Magic Quadrant for Business Intelligence and Analytics Platforms. This release has caused a lot of noise in the Analytics Market. Vendors have changed quadrants or even disappeared completely (eg. Oracle).

Traditionally, the Analytics Market is characterized by IT-led buying. Over the last years there is a transition ongoing towards Business-led buying. IT-led buying focusses on governance, consistency and scalability. Business-led buying on the other hand has a focus on speed and discovery.

So why did Oracle disappear from the Magic Quadrant? Oracle and Gartner have a different view / opinion when it comes to Business Intelligence & Analytics.

Gartner writes the following in their Summary; “The BI and analytics platform market’s multiyear shift from IT-led enterprise reporting to business-led self-service analytics has passed the tipping point. Most new buying is of modern, business-user-centric platforms forcing a new market perspective, significantly reordering the vendor landscape.” 

Oracle’s Business Analytics Product offering focusses on IT as well as the Business. It’s Oracle’s vision to support both to be able to realize the full potential of Analytics.

Since Oracle acquired Siebel, Oracle offers a platform; OBIEE, which supports the IT-led buying. Over the last years Oracle experienced a lot of competition from companies like QlikView and Tableau. These companies have successfully targeted the Agile / Self-Service preferences of the Business. Oracle was not able to compete with these companies. Last year Oracle has launched their Oracle Data Visualization (Visual Analyzer) product. Visual Analyzer is Oracle’s answer to QlikView and Tableau. Now Oracle is able to service both IT as well as the Business.

This is the difference between the view / opinion of Gartner versus Oracle. Gartner focusses in its Magic Quadrant for Business Intelligence and Analytics Platforms on the Business and Self-Service. Oracle focusses both on IT and the Business. Oracle offers OBIEE (IT) and Visual Analyzer (Business) On Premise or BICS (IT) and Visual Analyzer (Business) in the Cloud. 

The confusing thing might be that Gartner shifted its focus to solely Business Intelligence and Analytics for the Business, while the name of the Magic Quadrant still is the same as last year.

For me it is not a matter of right or wrong, but I think it is good to see things in context.

I believe in Oracle’s strategy when it comes to Business Intelligence and Analytics. If necessary or desired, I would be happy to put things in context.

Daan Bakboord

Mobile Analytics – Native, Web, Hybrid

Last week I had a discussion with my colleagues over @Scamander during one of our Tech Sessions. The subject was (Oracle) Mobile Analytics, which is one of the Big Data and Analytics Top Ten Trends for 2014. During the discussion we were discussing the difference between Native Apps and Web Apps and the necessity of a Native App when you can built / use  a Web App. Because of a time constraint we were not able to finish our discussion.

My colleague; Daoud Urdu pointed me to the following presentation; ‘HTML5 and the Journey to the Modern and Mobile Web‘. This gives some valuable background to Mobile Application Development.